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Diurnal and photoperiodic changes in Thyrotrophin stimulating hormone β (TSHβ) expression, and associated regulation of deiodinase enzymes (DIO2, DIO3) in the female juvenile chicken hypothalamus

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Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12554
JournalJournal of Neuroendocrinology
Volume29
Issue number12
Early online date8 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Abstract

Increased TSHβ expression in the pars tuberalis is thought to be an early step in the neuroendocrine mechanism transducing photoperiodic information. This study aimed to determine the relationship between long-photoperiods (LP) and diurnal TSHβ gene expression in the juvenile chicken by comparing LP-photostimulated birds with groups kept on short photoperiods (SP) for 1 or 12 days. TSHβ expression increased 3 and 23-fold after 1 and 12 days LP-photostimulation both during the day and at night. In both SP and LP conditions, TSHβ expression was between 3 and 14-fold higher at night than in the day, suggesting that TSHβ expression cycles in a diurnal pattern irrespective of photoperiod. The ratio of DIO2/3 was decreased on LPs, consequent upon changes in DIO3 expression, but there was no evidence of any diurnal effect on DIO2 or DIO3 expression. Plasma prolactin concentrations revealed both an effect of LPs and time-of-day. Thus, TSHβ expression changes in a dynamic fashion, both diurnally and in response to photoperiod. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • photoperiodism, reproduction, pars tuberalis, thyroid

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