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Do golf fans walk the talk? Follow up of spectators’ beliefs and self-reported physical activity 3 months after they attended a professional golf tournament in the United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ open sport & exercise medicine
Volume5
Issue number1
Early online date23 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jan 2019

Abstract

Background: Previous research of spectators at professional golf tournaments has highlighted that obtaining exercise/physical activity (PA) can be a motivator to attend, and that spectators can engage in health-enhancing PA while at the event. We assessed whether attending a golf event and receiving an intervention improve knowledge and change attitudes related to physical activity, and self-reported physical activity 3 months later.

Methods: Follow-up observational study. Spectators at a European Tour Golf event were given a leaflet about physical activity and health. Three months after that event, we emailed a questionnaire to all 326 spectators who had participated in the original study and provided us their contact details.

Results: 135 spectators (41.4%) completed the questionnaire. Among responders, 68.0% 'agreed/strongly agreed' that their knowledge relating to PA had increased, 65.1% agreed/strongly agreed that receiving this information at the event made them consider increasing physical activity in daily life and 40.4% reported that they had increased their physical activity during the 3 months after the golf tournament.

Principal findings/conclusions: Golf spectators may contemplate/prepare to increase PA in daily life while a smaller number self-report an increase in PA during the 3 months post intervention at a golf tournament. Spectators' preferred method for receiving information about 'active spectating' is via a big screen. These findings are presented with caution, as respondents may not be representative of all golf spectators.

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