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Dynamic changes in lung microRNA profiles during the development of pulmonary hypertension due to chronic hypoxia and monocrotaline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Paola Caruso
  • Margaret R MacLean
  • Raya Khanin
  • John McClure
  • Elaine Soon
  • Mark Southgate
  • Robert A MacDonald
  • Jenny A Greig
  • Keith E Robertson
  • Rachel Masson
  • Laura Denby
  • Yvonne Dempsie
  • Lu Long
  • Nicholas W Morrell
  • Andrew H Baker

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)716-23
Number of pages8
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that have the capacity to control protein production through binding "seed" sequences within a target mRNA. Each miRNA is capable of potentially controlling hundreds of genes. The regulation of miRNAs in the lung during the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We screened lung miRNA profiles in a longitudinal and crossover design during the development of PAH caused by chronic hypoxia or monocrotaline in rats. We identified reduced expression of Dicer, involved in miRNA processing, during the onset of PAH after hypoxia. MiR-22, miR-30, and let-7f were downregulated, whereas miR-322 and miR-451 were upregulated significantly during the development of PAH in both models. Differences were observed between monocrotaline and chronic hypoxia. For example, miR-21 and let-7a were significantly reduced only in monocrotaline-treated rats. MiRNAs that were significantly regulated were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. By using in vitro studies, we demonstrated that hypoxia and growth factors implicated in PAH induced similar changes in miRNA expression. Furthermore, we confirmed miR-21 downregulation in human lung tissue and serum from patients with idiopathic PAH.

CONCLUSIONS: Defined miRNAs are regulated during the development of PAH in rats. Therefore, miRNAs may contribute to the pathogenesis of PAH and represent a novel opportunity for therapeutic intervention.

    Research areas

  • Animals, Anoxia, Cell Hypoxia, Cells, Cultured, Chronic Disease, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelial Cells, Fibroblasts, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Lung, Male, MicroRNAs, Monocrotaline, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reproducibility of Results, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Ribonuclease III, Time Factors

ID: 23490253