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Endothelial progenitor cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)L964-L969
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of physiology-Lung cellular and molecular physiology
Volume305
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Abstract

The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to compare circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to age, sex, and cigarette smoking matched healthy controls. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 37) and healthy controls (n = 19) were matched by age, sex, and smoking status. Circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34(+) or CD133(+) mononuclear cells) and endothelial progenitor cells (CD34(+)KDR(+) or CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) mononuclear cells) were quantified by flow cytometry. Endothelial cell-colony forming units from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantified in vitro and phenotypic analysis carried out using immunocytochemistry. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had more circulating mononuclear cells compared with controls (8.4 +/- 0.6 vs. 5.9 +/- 0.4 X 10(9) cells/l; P = 0.02). CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells were reduced as a proportion of mononuclear cells in patients compared with controls (0.99 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.12%; P = 0.02); however, there were no differences in the absolute number of CD34(+), CD34(+)KDR(+), or CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cells (P > 0.05 for all). Endothelial cell-colony forming units were increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with controls (13.7 +/- 5.2 vs. 2.7 +/- 0.9 colonies; P = 0.048). In contrast to previous studies, the number of circulating progenitor cells was not reduced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with carefully matched controls. It seems unlikely that circulating endothelial progenitor cells or failure of angiogenesis plays a central role in the development of emphysema.

    Research areas

  • circulating endothelial progenitor cells, COPD, endothelial cell-colony forming unit, hematopoietic stem cells, PERIPHERAL-BLOOD, ANGIOGENESIS, MONOCYTES, SMOKERS

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