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Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

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    Rights statement: © 2008 Ryan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/9/6
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6
JournalBMC Neuroscience
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Abstract

Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity

    Research areas

  • Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Conserved Sequence, Cytoplasm, Evolution, Molecular, Invertebrates, Mice, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, PDZ Domains, Protein Binding, Protein Interaction Mapping, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis, Protein, Species Specificity, Synaptic Transmission

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