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How do martensitic twin boundaries move?

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMODELING AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MATERIALS BEHAVIOR AND EVOLUTION
EditorsA Zavaliangos, V Tikare, EA Olevsky
Place of PublicationWARRENDALE
PublisherMaterials Research Society
Pages155-160
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)1-55899-667-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
EventSymposium on Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Materials Behavior and Evolution held at the 2002 MRS Spring Meeting - SAN FRANCISCO
Duration: 2 Apr 20025 Apr 2002

Conference

ConferenceSymposium on Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Materials Behavior and Evolution held at the 2002 MRS Spring Meeting
CitySAN FRANCISCO
Period2/04/025/04/02

Abstract

The martensitic phase transformation from bcc to hcp underlies a number of curious effects, including shape-memory and superelasticity. The distinctive feature is the microscopic reversibility of the transition: at the atomic level, the position of each atom is uniquely related between phases. Moreover, this one-to-one relationship holds not only for the perfect crystal transformation mechanism, but also for the topological defects (such as twin boundaries) which are created in the transformation. Furthermore, for shape memory effect the microscopic relationship must be preserved by the deformation mechanism active in the material. In this paper, we examine the microscopic phenomena which allow these relationships to hold, and the consequences for shape-memory alloy design.

    Research areas

  • ZIRCONIUM, SIMULATION

ID: 1279661