Edinburgh Research Explorer

Human resource technology disruptions and their implications for human resources management in healthcare organizations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Open Access permissions

Open

Documents

  • Download as Adobe PDF

    Rights statement: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

    Final published version, 595 KB, PDF document

    Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2019

Abstract

Concern among the public and policymakers about current and future major staff shortages is increasing. Strengthening Human Resource (HR) practices and adopting HR technologies such as Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS), that can collect, store and report workforce data are often described as a potential solution to this problem. Indeed, examples from other industries show that HRIS can help to launch or manage, as well as provide ongoing insights concerning the whole career cycle of an employee. However, few of the existing studies that discuss technology or its impacts on the future of work have focused on health organizations, and those that do have not received sufficient attention in health literature. Furthermore, such contributions as there have been have either prioritized a particular type of technology or focused mainly on the effect of automation on health professionals' work. They have thus overlooked the full range of possible uses of these technologies and, specifically, have neglected the topic of HR for Health (HRH) management in health organizations. The primary aim of this paper is to address this lacuna, with specific reference to the existing categorization of HR technological disruptions. To conclude, health organizations and the health and HR professionals who work within them need to use HRIS responsibly, finding a balance between the drive for innovation, productivity and efficiency and respect for all potential legal, ethical and compliance issues, as well as taking account of the importance of HRH wellbeing and satisfaction.

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 86352163