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Insulin Response in Relation to Insulin Sensitivity An appropriate beta-cell response in black South African women

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  • Julia H. Goedecke
  • Joel A. Dave
  • Mirjam V. Faulenbach
  • Kristina M. Utzschneider
  • Estelle V. Lambert
  • Sacha West
  • Malcolm Collins
  • Tommy Olsson
  • Brian R. Walker
  • Jonathan R. Seckl
  • Steven E. Kahn
  • Naomi S. Levitt

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http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/32/5/860
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)860-865
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to characterize differences in the acute insulin response to glucose (AIR(g)) relative to insulin sensitivity (S-I) in black and white premenopausal normoglycemic South African women matched for body fatness.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross-sectional analysis including 57 black and white South African women matched for BMI, S-I, AIR(g), and the disposition index (AIR(g) X S-I) were performed using a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test with minimal model analysis, and similar measures were analyzed using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography.

RESULTS - S-I was significantly lower (4.4 +/- 0.8 vs. 9.4 +/- 0.8 and 2.9 +/- 0.8 vs. 6.0 +/- 0.8 X 10(-5) min(-1)/[pmol/l], P < 0.001) and AIR(g) was significantly higher (1,028 +/- 255 vs. 352 +/- 246 and 1,968 +/- 229 vs. 469 +/- 246 pmol/l, P < 0.001), despite similar body fatness (30.9 +/- 1.4 vs. 29.7 +/- 1.3 and 46.8 +/- 1.2 vs. 44.4 +/- 1.3%) in the normal-weight and obese black women compared With their white counterparts, respectively, Disposition index, a marker of beta-cell function, was not different between ethnic groups (3,811 +/- 538 vs. 2,966 +/- 518 and 3,646 +/- 485 vs. 2,353 +/- 518 x 10(-5) min, P = 0.10). Similar results Were obtained for the OGTT-derived measures.

CONCLUSIONS - Black South African women are more insulin resistant than their white counterparts but compensate by increasing their insulin response to maintain normal glucose levels, Suggesting an appropriate beta-cell response for the level of insulin sensitivity.

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