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META-ANALYSIS OF RESPONSE TIMES AND SAFETY SYSTEMS TO THE FIRE SIZE, GROWTH AND DAMAGE, BASED ON UK, USA AND NEW ZEALAND FIRE STATISTICS DATABASES.

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2nd International Conference on Structural Safety under Fire & Blast Loading - CONFAB 2017
EditorsYong Lu, Asif Usmani, Katherine Cashell, Purnendu Das
Pages108-117
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-9998536-0-0
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sep 2017
Event2nd International Conference on Structural Safety under Fire and Blast Loading - London
Duration: 10 Sep 2017 → …
https://www.fireandblast.co.uk/

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Structural Safety under Fire and Blast Loading
Abbreviated titleCONFAB2017
CityLondon
Period10/09/17 → …
Internet address

Abstract

National fire statistic databases provide the opportunity to assess the response of real fires in real structures. Different countries have developed their own databases using on-line forms completed after an event by fire departments. Common mandatory fields include response times, area of damage, size of fire at arrival and after extinguishment. This paper analyses three such fire statistics from the IRS, UK; NFIRS, USA and the New Zealand Fire Service. These national statistical estimates also acknowledge the resilience of structures to fire shocks. During reporting structural fire events, departments must detail the ignition of the fire, the type and status of the building, the response times of fire services and, as a consequence, the frequency of fires can be deduced. Further fields question the intensity, powering factors, and spread (both on arrival of services and extent at extinguishment) of the fire. Fire spread includes the area damaged in square meters in both the horizontal and vertical direction in UK and a percentage of area damaged in USA, while in New Zealand flame, smoke and water damage are also reported. Additional information is also requested on the effectiveness of alarm and safety systems based on type, location and reasons why they did not operate as intended. The coalescence of this data will provide a quantification of the size and scale of damage with respect to different intervention strategies and can (given well-defined statistics) be subdivided by building type and use. A comparison between the different countries is essential to highlight how each of them approaches the problem and the data available, and will allow an assessment of the ability to create a benchmark able to improve the understanding on the safe and resilient design of structures.

ID: 59208881