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Methylcellulose as a scaffold in the culture of liver-organoids for the potential of treating acute live failure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Anil Chandrashekran
  • Ragai R Mitry
  • Tharindu Prema-chandra
  • Chris Starling
  • Sharon Lehec
  • Valeria Iansante
  • Emer Fitzpatrick
  • Celine Filippi
  • Maesha Deheragoda
  • David Hay
  • Anil Dhawan

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https://insights.bio/cell-and-gene-therapy-insights/?bio_journals=methylcellulose-as-a-scaffold-in-the-culture-of-liver-organoids-for-the-potential-of-treating-acute-liver-failure
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1087-1103
JournalCell and Gene Therapy Insights
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Dec 2018

Abstract

Much progress has been made in understanding the development of human organs through advanced cellular and molecular techniques. Acute liver failure (ALF) in children is a life-threatening condition that relies on liver or hepatocyte transplantation. The translation of novel regenerative medicine strategies for the treatment of ALF is however somewhat limited. Here, we show that in vitro liver-organoids derived from human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells and human cadaveric donor derived hepatocytes, cultured in a clinically appropriate manner, exhibit liver function. We obtained organoids that varied in size and morphology which produced albumin, and detoxified ammonium chloride into urea. Immunohistochemistry of these organoids revealed hepatocyte specific, non-parenchymal markers and histological organisation. Our in vitro findings indicate that these organoids may be a useful bridge in ALF while awaiting liver recovery or transplant. The organoid culture system we have established is also well suited to understanding organ development and drug screening.

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