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NMDA receptor subunits and associated signaling molecules mediating antidepressant-related effects of NMDA-GluN2B antagonism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Carly Kiselycznyk
  • Nicholas J. Jury
  • Lindsay R. Halladay
  • Kazu Nakazawa
  • Masayoshi Mishina
  • Rolf Sprengel
  • Seth G. N. Grant
  • Per Svenningsson
  • Andrew Holmes

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume287
Early online date21 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

Abstract

Drugs targeting the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may be efficacious for treating mood disorders, as exemplified by the rapid antidepressant effects produced by single administration of the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. Though the precise mechanisms underlying the antidepressantrelated effects of NMDAR antagonism remain unclear, recent studies implicate specific NMDAR subunits, including GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor interacting molecule, PSD-95. Here, integrating mutant and pharmacological in mice, we investigated the contribution of these subunits and molecules to antidepressant-related behaviors and the antidepressant-related effects of the GluN2B blocker, Ro 25-6981. We found that global deletion of GluA1 or PSD-95 reduced forced swim test (FST) immobility, mimicking the antidepressant-related effect produced by systemically administered Ro 25-6981 in C57BL/6J mice. Moreover, the FST antidepressant-like effects of systemic Ro 25-6981 were intact in mutants with global GluA1 deletion or GluN1 deletion in forebrain interneurons, but were absent in mutants constitutively lacking G1uN2A or PSD-95. Next, we found that microinfusing Ro 25-6981 into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not basolateral amygdala, of C57BL/6J mice was sufficient to produce an antidepressant-like effect. Together, these findings extend and refine current understanding of the mechanisms mediating antidepressant-like effects produced by NMDAR-GluN2B antagonists, and may inform the development of a novel class of medications for treating depression that target the GluN2B subtype of NMDAR. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

    Research areas

  • Glutamate, PSD-95, Prefrontal cortex, GluN2B, GluA1, Depression, FORCED SWIM TEST, MICE LACKING, ETHANOL INTOXICATION, STRESS-REACTIVITY, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, FEAR EXTINCTION, KNOCKOUT MICE, ANIMAL-MODELS, AMPA RECEPTOR, C57BL/6J MICE

ID: 23612068