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Posttraumatic stress disorder following asthma attack: The role of agency beliefs in mediating psychiatric morbidity

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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Journal of Mental Health on 4/7/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09638237.2017.1340628

    Accepted author manuscript, 769 KB, PDF document

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638237.2017.1340628
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-350
JournalJournal of Mental Health
Volume26
Issue number4
Early online date4 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2017

Abstract

Background: The link between serious illness and subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric comorbidity has been established. In populations with asthma, however, few studies have investigated this link, or what psychological mechanisms mediate it. Healthcare guidance for chronic conditions, and PTSD literature, highlight “agency beliefs” as a direction for investigation.

Aims: To determine the prevalence of PTSD following asthma attack, and investigate whether agency beliefs mediate PTSD and comorbid psychiatric symptoms in this population.

Method: We recruited 110 adults with asthma from online peer support forums. Participants completed the Asthma Symptom Checklist, PTSD Checklist, GHQ-28, General Self-Efficacy scale, and Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale.

Results: 20% of our sample met criteria for PTSD. Regression results indicated that higher asthma severity significantly predicted PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Lower self-efficacy significantly predicted PTSD symptoms while controlling for asthma severity, however Locus of Control (LoC) did not improve the model further. Self-efficacy, but not LoC, significantly partially mediated the effect of asthma severity on PTSD severity and psychiatric co-morbidity.

Conclusions: PTSD and other psychiatric symptoms in asthma populations are mediated in part by self-efficacy. Safeguarding and improving self-efficacy in this population is an important area for future research and intervention.

    Research areas

  • PTSD, psychiatric co-morbidity, self-efficacy, locus of contro, chronic illness, agentic beliefs

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