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Radiographic findings in cats with mycobacterial infections

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Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)718-724
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume13
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Abstract

This study describes radiographic changes associated with mycobacterial infection in 33 domestic cats confirmed by culture or interferon-gamma testing. Infection was seen most frequently in adult (average age 5.7 years; range 1.5–12 years), non-pedigree (87%; 27/31), neutered male cats (69%; 22/32). The most common infections were Mycobacterium microti (60%; 18/30) and Mycobacterium bovis (37%; 11/30); Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium malmoense were infrequently cultured (3% of each; 1/30). Radiographs were available for the thorax (24 cats), abdomen (eight), appendicular skeleton (11) and head (three). Radiographic changes affected the thorax most commonly, consisting of bronchial (46%; 11/24), alveolar (38%; 9/24), nodular unstructured interstitial (38%; 9/24) or unstructured interstitial (25%; 6/24) lung patterns, which were often mixed. Perihilar or sternal lymphadenopathy were common (42%; 10/24), particularly perihilar lymphadenopathy (25%; 6/24). Skeletal changes were found in the distal antebrachium (three), pes (two), maxilla, scapula, spine, manus, femur, and tarsus (one each). Changes were typically osteolytic (73%; 8/11), often permeative osteolytic (64%; 7/11). Osteoproliferative changes were seen in three cats and soft tissue swelling in five cats, which were adjacent to the bony abnormality in four cats. Other changes included submandibular soft tissue swelling, marked aortic, aortic root and brachiocephalic trunk calcification, and soft tissue swelling with calcification in the distal antebranchium which was not involving bone. Abdominal changes were uncommon (seen in 2/8 cats) and consisted of hepatomegaly and hepatosplenomegaly. In summary, radiographic changes were varied, no lesion was pathognomic for mycobacterial infection, and pathology was seen most commonly in the thorax.

    Research areas

  • Mycobacterial

ID: 421825