Edinburgh Research Explorer

Reforming State Pension provision in ‘Liberal’ Anglo Saxon Countries: Re-commodification, cost-containment or recalibration?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Open Access permissions

Open

Documents

  • Download as Adobe PDF

    Rights statement: © Cambridge University Press. Lain, D., Vickerstaff, S. & Loretto, W. 2012, "Reforming State Pension provision in ‘Liberal’ Anglo Saxon Countries: Re-commodification, cost-containment or recalibration?", in Social Policy and Society 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1474746412000450

    Final published version, 790 KB, PDF document

Original languageEnglish
JournalSocial Policy and Society
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Abstract

There are good theoretical reasons for expecting pension reform in Anglo-Saxon countries
to follow similar paths. Esping-Andersen (1990) famously identified these countries as
belonging to the same ‘Liberal’model of welfare, under which benefits, including pensions,
are said to be residual and weakly ‘de-commodifying’, reducing individuals’ reliance on the
market to a much lesser degree than elsewhere. Pierson (2001) has furthermore argued
that because of path dependency welfare states are likely to follow established paths when
dealing with ‘permanent austerity’. Following this logic, Aysan and Beaujot (2009) argue
that pension reform in liberal countries has resulted in increasing re-commodification. In
this paper, we review pension reforms in the UK, USA, Canada and New Zealand in the
2000s. We argue that because, in reality, the pension systems differed significantly at the
point of reform, the paths followed varied considerably in terms of whether they focused
on ‘re-commodification’, ‘cost-containment’ or ‘recalibration’.

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 3499500