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Relationship between e-cigarette point of sale recall and e-cigarette use in secondary school children: a cross-sectional study

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    Rights statement: © 2016 Best et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated

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http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-2968-2
Original languageEnglish
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 Apr 2016

Abstract

Background: There has been a rapid increase in the retail availability of e-cigarettes in the UK and elsewhere. It is known that exposure to cigarette point-of-sale (POS) displays influences smoking behaviour and intentions in
young people. However, there is as yet no evidence regarding the relationship between e-cigarette POS display exposure and e-cigarette use in young people.

Methods: This cross sectional survey was conducted in four high schools in Scotland. A response rate of 87 % and a total sample of 3808 was achieved. Analysis was by logistic regression on e-cigarette outcomes with standard
errors adjusted for clustering within schools. The logistic regression models were adjusted for recall of other ecigarette adverts, smoking status, and demographic variables. Multiple chained imputation was employed to assess
the consistency of the findings across different methods of handling missing data.

Results: Adolescents who recalled seeing e-cigarettes in small shops were more likely to have tried an e-cigarette (OR 1.92 99 % CI 1.61 to 2.29). Adolescents who recalled seeing e-cigarettes for sale in small shops (OR 1.80 99 % CI 1.08 to 2.99) or supermarkets (OR 1.70 99 % CI 1.22 to 2.36) were more likely to intend to try them in the next 6 months.

Conclusions: This study has found a cross-sectional association between self-reported recall of e-cigarette POS displays and use of, and intention to use, e-cigarettes. The magnitude of this association is comparable to that between tobacco point of sale recall and intention to use traditional cigarettes in the same sample. Further longitudinal data is required to confirm a causal relationship between e-cigarette point of sale exposure and their use and future use by young people.

    Research areas

  • E-cigarettes, Vaping, Adolescents, Advertising, Point of sale display, Smoking, Tobacco control

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