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Reliability of genetic evaluation using purebred and crossbred data from different pig farms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-56
Number of pages10
JournalAnimal Science Papers and Reports
Volume35
Issue number1
Early online date23 Feb 2017
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Feb 2017

Abstract

The impact of connectedness between contemporary groups (CG) on the reliability of genetic evaluation was analysed in Landrace (L) and Large-White (LW) pigs and their crossbreds on 23 245 data records from three large scale farms and 70 family farms in the period of 2002-2012. Gene flow (GF) and connectedness rating (CR) methods were used to assess the information concerning the level of connectedness. The average reliability of estimated breeding values (EBV’s) was calculated for all CGs in single and joint analyses for different combinations of data. Backfat thickness (BF) was the focal trait of the analysis. The average GF in the ten-year period was low and ranged from 0% of the genes originating from other farms on several CGs and 7% genes on farm B originating from farm C in L and from 0% to 6% of the genes originating from farm A on the group of family farms with respect to LW. The average CR was lower than 0.03 between all CGs. Thus, an unreliable comparison of estimated breeding values between animals from different herds could be expected. After inclusion of crossbred data, reliability increased from 0.08 to 0.27 for family farms in L and from 0.03 to 0.35 in the group of farms C in LW. Results showed the necessity to increase connectedness and consequently individual reliability of genetic evaluation and reliability of the across-herd comparison. Proper organisation of artificial insemination is proposed as an adequate tool to increase connectedness.

    Research areas

  • Connectedness, Crossbreeding, Pigs, Reliability

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