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“Solidarity is our weapon”: Social mobilisation in Scotland in the contest of the post-political condition

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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Mocca, E. and Osborne, S. (2018), “Solidarity is our weapon”: Social Mobilisation in Scotland in the Contest of the Post‐Political Condition. Antipode. . doi:10.1111/anti.12466, which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anti.12466. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anti.12466
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)620-641
JournalAntipode
Volume51
Issue number2
Early online date22 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 2019

Abstract

The consensual climate of the post-political order has been recently disrupted in Europe. The mass protests staged in different European countries and the resurgences of the extreme parties in response to the multiple European crises witness the “cracks” in consensual politics. While much of the scholarly attention has been drawn onto the socio-political implications of large-scale upraises, the contribution of bottom-up sub-national groups to the “return of the political” has been under-researched. Therefore, this article focuses on sub-national grassroots groups as instances of the “properly political” (Swyngedouw, 2009). It is contended that these groups, by putting in place acts of solidarity, are “agonistic” political forms, containing in nuce the potential to counter-act the post-political order and to shape a new politics. To interrogate this argument, the article reports the findings of a case study analysis involving four grassroots groups based in Scotland.

    Research areas

  • post-politics, social movements, solidarity, Scotland

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