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The Edinburgh Speech Production Facility's articulatory corpus of spontaneous dialogue.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • James Scobbie
  • Christian Geng
  • Cedric Macmartin
  • Ellen Bard
  • Barry Campbell
  • Catherine Dickie
  • Eddie Dubourg
  • Bill Hardcastle
  • Phil Hoole
  • Evia Kanaida
  • Robin Lickley
  • Satsuki Nakai
  • Marianne Pouplier
  • Sonja Schaeffler
  • Ronnie Wiegand
  • Kevin White
  • Alan Wrench

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2429-2429
Number of pages1
JournalThe Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume128
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Abstract

The EPSRC-funded Edinburgh Speech Production is built around two synchronized Carstens AG500 electromagnetic articulographs (EMAs) in order to capture articulatory/acoustic data from spontaneous dialogue. An initial articulatory corpus was designed with two aims. The first was to elicit a range of speech styles/registers from speakers, and therefore provide an alternative to fully scripted corpora. The second was to extend the corpus beyond monologue, by using tasks that promote natural discourse and interaction. A subsidiary driver was to use dialects from outwith North America: dialogues paired up a Scottish English and a Southern British English speaker. Tasks. Monologue: Story reading of "Comma Gets a Cure"' [Honorof et al. (2000)], lexical sets [Wells (1982)], spontaneous story telling, diadochokinetic tasks. Dialogue: Map tasks [Anderson et al. (1991)], "Spot the Difference"' picture tasks [Bradlow et al. (2007)], story-recall. Shadowing of the spontaneous story telling by the second participant. Each dialogue session includes approximately 30 min of speech, and there are acoustics-only baseline materials. We will introduce the corpus and highlight the role of articulatory production data in helping provide a fuller understanding of various spontaneous speech phenomena by presenting examples of naturally occurring covert speech errors, accent accommodation, turn taking negotiation, and shadowing.

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