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The long-acting COX-2 inhibitor mavacoxib (Trocoxil (TM)) has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on canine cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells in vitro

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    Rights statement: © 2014 Pang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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http://www.biomedcentral.com/1746-6148/10/184
Original languageEnglish
Article number184
Pages (from-to)184
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2014

Abstract

Background: The NSAID mavacoxib (Trocoxcil (TM)) is a recently described selective COX-2 inhibitor used for the management of inflammatory disease in dogs. It has a long plasma half-life, requiring less frequent dosing and supporting increased owner compliance in treating their dogs. Although the use of NSAIDs has been described in cancer treatment in dogs, there are no studies to date that have examined the utility of mavacoxib specifically.

Results: In this study we compared the in vitro activity of a short-acting non-selective COX inhibitor (carprofen) with mavacoxib, on cancer cell and cancer stem cell survival. We demonstrate that mavacoxib has a direct cell killing effect on cancer cells, increases apoptosis in cancer cells in a manner that may be independent of caspase activity, and has an inhibitory effect on cell migration. Importantly, we demonstrate that cancer stem cells derived from osteosarcoma cell lines are sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of mavacoxib.

Conclusions: Both NSAIDs can inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in vitro. Importantly, cancer stem cells derived from an osteosarcoma cell line are sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of mavacoxib. Our results suggest that mavacoxib has anti-tumour effects and that this in vitro anti-cancer activity warrants further study.

    Research areas

  • Mavacoxib, COX-2, Cancer stem cells, Osteosarcoma, Canine, CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION, BREAST-CANCER, COLON-CANCER, PROSPECTIVE IDENTIFICATION, OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS, TRANSGENIC MICE, CARCINOMA, THERAPY, GROWTH, ANGIOGENESIS

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