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Visual assessment of atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of pathologically confirmed young-onset dementias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Marcus Likeman
  • Valerie M Anderson
  • John M Stevens
  • Adam D Waldman
  • Alison K Godbolt
  • Chris Frost
  • Martin N Rossor
  • Nick C Fox

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1410-5
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of visual inspection of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a range of pathologically confirmed diseases causing young-onset dementia and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of atrophy patterns for Alzheimer disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD).

DESIGN: Sixty-two patients with pathologically confirmed diseases that may present as young-onset dementia were selected from a biopsy and postmortem series. The first diagnostic T1-weighted volumetric MRI was obtained for each patient, together with images from 22 healthy control subjects. All MRIs were assessed for regional atrophy independently by 3 neuroradiologists, blinded to all clinical details except age. Observers were also asked to use their clinical judgment to form a diagnosis.

RESULTS: Eighty-seven percent of dementia cases were distinguished from controls after visual inspection of MRI, and a correct pathologically confirmed diagnosis was given in 58% of cases. Hippocampal atrophy was noted in 92% of AD cases but was commonly seen in other dementias and controls. A bilateral symmetrical pattern of hippocampal atrophy discriminated AD from FTLD with 47% specificity, while posterior greater than anterior gradient of atrophy was 92% specific for AD. Atrophy of the anterior, inferior, and lateral temporal lobes was suggestive of FTLD pathology (> or =90% sensitivity), while anterior greater than posterior gradient of atrophy and hemispheric asymmetry of atrophy were each at least 85% specific for FTLD.

CONCLUSION: Despite variation and overlap of atrophy patterns, visual inspection of regional atrophy on MRI may aid in discriminating AD and FTLD.

    Research areas

  • Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Atrophy, Confidence Intervals, Dementia, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Sensitivity and Specificity, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 46191091