Edinburgh Research Explorer

Why Ontologies are not Enough for Knowledge Sharing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

  • F. S. Correa da Silva
  • W. W. Vasconcelos
  • J. Agusti
  • D. S. Robertson
  • A. C. V. Melo

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMultiple Approaches to Intelligent Systems
Subtitle of host publication12th International Conference on Industrial and Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems IEA/AIE-99, Cairo, Egypt, May 31 - June 3, 1999. Proceedings
EditorsIbrahim Imam, Yves Kodratoff, Ayman El-Dessouki, Moonis Ali
PublisherSpringer-Verlag GmbH
Pages520-529
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-66076-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer Berlin / Heidelberg
Volume1611
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Abstract

Knowledge sharing is difficult. One reason is that it is hard to decide how to describe a domain in a way which suits everyone interested in the knowledge. Tackling this problem has been a central theme of the surge in ontological research over recent years. Unfortunately, getting an agreed ontology is not the end of our problems, since the way we represent knowledge is intimately linked to the inferences we expect to perform with it. We introduce three inference systems and discuss the problems of having knowledge passing through them, which are representative of complex problems we may need to solve for knowledge sharing.

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